GLOBALTAP featured on Danish Broadcasting Station

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Each year, Americans spend 50 billion dollars on plastic bottled water. This is equivalent to $1,500 worth of plastic bottles per second.

In 2014 the San Francisco the first city in the world to ban bottled water. Instead of focussing on recycling these water bottles, they are looking to be completely waste-free by 2018. 

Click here to watch this video in it’s entirety.

Could Berkeley’s soda tax be a model for tackling obesity across America?

We all know what happened in the election few days ago. Berkeley city in California definitely made history in this election to be the first city in the nation to impose a tax on sugary drinks.

 

Berkely Vs. Big Soda advocacy group worked hard and lobbied for this victory as a part of their Healthy Child Initiative campaign. There will be a $0.01 per ounce tax on all beverages sweetened with sugar ( except alcohol, dairy products and drinks for medical purposes). The revenue of this tax will support the city’s health and health education programs.

This indeed shows how America is ready to fight for a healthier society and let’s hope there will be many cities and states that will follow Berkeley’s lead to a healthier America.

Read more here 

 

Legislation for Easier Access to Tap Water in San Francisco

As early as January 1, 2013, San Franciscans could save money and stay healthy by having an easier access to the city’s water supplies!

David Chiu, the President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors recently introduced a legislation that would “require building owners and developers to install tap water filling stations on the premises if they’re already required to provide drinking fountains. Buildings undergoing major renovations involving their plumbing systems that supply drinking fountains also would have to comply”.

Read more about the proposed legislation:

SF Gate Article by Rachel Gordon

KTSF 26 Article by 

GlobalTap Featured at Airlinetrends.com

San Francisco International Airport installs water bottle refill stations after security

Since security rules were tightened several years ago, passengers are not allowed to take more than a tiny drop of water (3 fl oz / 90ml in the U.S. and 100 ml in Europe) through security. This has been a nuisance for the travelling public, as many people have to purchase a bottle of water again beyond security to replace the one left behind.

Alternatively, passengers can bring an empty bottle through security and fill it up from a tap on the other side. However, as the Economist last year blogged, surprisingly few airports have made water fountains available or have hidden them in hard to find corners (by the way Amsterdam Schiphol Airport’s new ‘Ambient Gate’ is a welcome exception). Furthermore, bathroom sinks and public drinking fountains are often not in a very hygienic state, and many aren’t designed to allow for a easy fill of a bottle.

Global Tap hydration stations
San Francisco International Airport (SFO), already one of the most environmentally active airports in the U.S., has come up with an innovative solution to solve this situation and to reduce plastic waste. The airport has installed two tap water ‘hydration stations’ in the ‘airside’ part of the terminal and encourages passengers to carry their emptied plastic containers through security

To read the rest of the article please visit here

 

San Fran Rolls Out Tap Water Refilling Stations

Those who live in San Francisco may have noticed strange new contraptions located around the city. These metal boxes are the new official “tap water refilling stations.”

The “refilling stations” are a project of the Department of the Environment, the Public Utilities Commission and Global Tap and are designed, according to the press release, “to promote free access to San Francisco’s great tasting tap water.” There are currently seven stations located around the city, but they plan to have a total of 15 units installed.

“People take for granted what’s in front of them, and that’s definitely the case for tap water,” said Tyrone Jue, spokesman for the PUC. “We need to remind people every chance we get that bottled water just isn’t necessary.” According to the PUC, the city’s tap water costs $.003 per gallon versus $1-$4 per gallon of bottled water. And it’s much better for the environment since it doesn’t come in plastic bottles.

Please click here to read the rest of the article.

 

Change Observer features GlobalTap

GlobalTap pilot dispenser in Yerba Buena Gardens, San Francisco. Courtesy IDEO.

More than 1 billion people worldwide lack access to clean water. The rest of us have an unlimited flow from the tap. Daniel H. Whitman, a Chicago architect and social entrepreneur who believes that access to water should be a fundamental human right, wants to link these two extremes. In 2008, he formed GlobalTap, a for-profit social enterprise with a dual mission: to sell and install tap-water-refilling stations in public places in North America and Europe, and then to divert revenues from this business to fund badly needed water projects in developing countries. “Water should be free and accessible to everybody,” Whitman says. “Water is not just for privileged people in privileged places.”

GlobalTap’s first phase began in a very privileged place, San Francisco, where a pilot project was launched last year with the installation of a refilling station in Yerba Buena Gardens. Not any ordinary looking water fountain, this one was designed by IDEOwith a slim 5-foot-high steel stem, a thrusting elbow shape and a nozzle that directs a stream of water into the bottle when activated by a button. Its form and mechanism are meant to appeal to the new water-bottle-toting generation as a way to encourage bottle reuse and reduce plastic waste. The palette — blue is currently installed and orange is being contemplated — make the refilling station conspicuous in settings such as parks, lakefronts, bus stops and train stations, among the many urban sites under consideration. “We wanted a bold look that pops out of the background,” says Tasos Karahalios, the GlobalTap project leader in IDEO’s Chicago office.

To read the rest of the article please click here.

Treehugger: GlobalTap Hits San Francisco With Free Water Bottle Refill Program

Getting free refills for your reusable water container can be tougher than it sounds. While it’d be nice to walk into a cafe or restaurant and ask to fill ‘er up, social decorum says you should buy something to sweeten up your request. While TapIt NYC has helped thirsty folks find free water refills, that’s one city – out of a whole nation of people we’re trying to get to switch from bottled water to reusable containers. But GlobalTap is on the task, working to get free, accessable and clean water refill stations to those carting around containers, and they’ve just hit San Francisco.
San Francisco Department of the Environment (SFE) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) have announced new tap water partnerships as part of the City’s efforts to promote “on the go” access to San Francisco’s great tasting Hetch Hetchy tap water while reducing waste from use of plastic bottled water.

In other words, the city is bringing drinking fountains back. London is already on it, and Paris has statuesque drinking fountains scattered throughout the city, so why shouldn’t San Francisco be right behind?

Click here to read the rest of the article.

GlobalTap’s San Francisco Refill Program featured at Threehugger

Getting free refills for your reusable water container can be tougher than it sounds. While it’d be nice to walk into a cafe or restaurant and ask to fill ‘er up, social decorum says you should buy something to sweeten up your request. While TapIt NYC has helped thirsty folks find free water refills, that’s one city – out of a whole nation of people we’re trying to get to switch from bottled water to reusable containers. But GlobalTap is on the task, working to get free, accessable and clean water refill stations to those carting around containers, and they’ve just hit San Francisco.
San Francisco Department of the Environment (SFE) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) have announced new tap water partnerships as part of the City’s efforts to promote “on the go” access to San Francisco’s great tasting Hetch Hetchy tap water while reducing waste from use of plastic bottled water.

In other words, the city is bringing drinking fountains back. London is already on it, and Paris has statuesque drinking fountains scattered throughout the city, so why shouldn’t San Francisco be right behind?

To read the full article, please visit GlobalTap Hits San Francisco With Free Water Bottle Refill Program